Truth

This is an excerpt from a larger manual I've been working on about a Theatre of Spirit... Truth 

The interest in the Theatre of Spirit is to present the Truth.  What is the Truth?  It is an expression that resonates within people on a visceral level.  Even if the person can intellectually make comments on the Truths we present, it is never capable of describing the Truth.

By committing to Truth, we open the universe of the stage.  Anything in the world can represent Truth if it strikes the audience right.  Vaudeville, realism, surrealism, clown, melodrama, tragedy, commedia, acrobatics:  These can all work together to form Truth.

The Truth is the overall goal of our Theatre of Spirit.  We strive to discover Images and Movements that when we juxtaposition them all together, they form a blanket of Truth.  These can be happy Truths, sad Truths, tragic or benevolent.

We cannot force Truths to occur on stage.  They happen when we least expect it.  We discover Truths.  So perhaps our prayer, in the beginning of inception of a play, is simply: Let us discover the Truth so that we may share it with the world.

The Truth is the fuel of our work.  The play is the vehicle.  If, in raising the play into adulthood, we find no Truth, the play will surely die.  Without a play though, we can never hope to stumble upon the Truth.  The Truth will always be bigger than us mortals, which is why we need a play to handle it.  We need something larger if we are to be capable of handling the Truth and delivering it to others.

If the work is simply making statements, or simply educating, then the theater has the potential to be nice, and quaint, and educational.  It might be informative, or a nice way to spend the evening.  But if the work is about the Truth, then people will stop in their tracks when they witness it.  They will become filled.  They will understand something deeper than they once knew.  They must stand up at the end because they are so grateful for even a flash second glimpse.  If the artist has done his or her job, the audience will beg of them to let them see more.  But the artist, practicing the art of egolessness, will know that they had no part of this beautiful expression.  They were merely conduits that the Truth was able to be expressed through, rather than by.

This is the fundamental nature of our work.  We are always looking to be used as vehicles.  We are smaller cogs, making up the bigger machine.  We must empty ourselves.  We must let go of the mind.  This way, we can become filled.  We can express Truth unknown to us.  We can do things we never dreamed capable.  We can do the impossible.  This is why we do the work.  This is what we hope to accomplish.